Saturday, August 29, 2020

Remote Teaching Journey -- Assumptions and Conversations

 

One of my new routines for this year is link to the CNN10 news for the day in an open Google doc with a table where my scholars can add their name, plus their noticing and wondering.

The first day I added this to our schedule (Thursday this week), there was a story about housing in LA and how homeowners are converting two car garages into apartments. I made the assumption that this would not be an engaging part of the news show for 10 year-olds, but recommended it as connected to our social studies standards on the topic of Economics.

In our end-of-day Google Meet, I shared how surprised I was that many had connected with that news story in their notice/wonders. One girl piped up that she found it fascinating because she wants to be an architect. Another loved that people did this not just for the money, but to help people have a home near their work.

Lesson: Never Assume.


In a writing workshop lesson under the doc camera, we began creating our identity webs this week. As I made mine, I talked about identity as the story we tell about ourselves. When I meet someone new, one part of my story often begins with, "I am a teacher." 

I went on to explain that identity is also the things about us that people see, and I added "woman" and "kind of old" and "white skin" to my identity web. I explained that I often don't think of my identity of "woman" until I am in a place where that stands out, at the car repair shop, for instance, where I am likely the only woman there. I encouraged them to think of the parts of their identity that others see.


On Friday, we watched this video about Ibtihaj Muhammad, which led to conversations about the meaning of the words stereotype and bias, and then I read aloud The Proudest Blue. 

Lesson: My commitment to be an antiracist teacher will not be revealed in big splashy announcements about my commitment, but rather in all the small conversations we will have (planned and unplanned) throughout the year. Being an antiracist teacher is a way of life, not a lesson plan.


9 comments:

  1. I love the lessons you are presenting to your students. The video is a great resource in combination with Ms. Muhammad's book.

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  2. SO good. Thank you for sharing this!

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  3. Love this! I am going to miss my kiddos this year; we volunteers will have to wait for a while before returning, understandably.

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  4. I appreciate your students' and your insights on this journey. I learn so much when I visit your blog. Thank you. :)

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  5. Thanks for being you and bringing us all into the selflessness of life and possibilities of change.

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  6. Thanks for being you and bringing us all into the selflessness of life and possibilities of change.

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  7. I love seeing all of your thinking about your teaching! You are so, so brilliant and inspire me every day! Thank you!

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  8. Love the last line: "Being an antiracist teacher is a way of life, not a lesson plan." You demonstrated this perfectly in the description of your classroom instruction/activities.

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  9. Your students are lucky to have such a committed teacher--you are really listening to them and that's huge!

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