Showing posts sorted by relevance for query poetry month 2013. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query poetry month 2013. Sort by date Show all posts

Monday, April 01, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.1

Wikimedia Commons Picture of the Year for 2012 by Pierre Dalous
When you go to the Wikimedia Commons site, you can't help but notice the picture of the year for 2012 -- this pair of European Bee Eaters. This picture will be the inspiration for my first poem-of-the-day for National Poetry Month 2013. I'll walk you through my process and we'll see what I come up with by the end of the post!

When I'm using an image as my inspiration for a poem, the first thing I do is just jot down whatever I see and whatever comes to mind:

gift
colors

I didn't get much down before curiosity got the best of me and I Googled this vibrant bird to learn more about it.

near-passerine (tree-dwelling)
before eating they remove the stingers
curved beak

I started jotting some lines, crossing through the ones I didn't like so that if I decided to use them later, I could still read what was there:

We are near-passerine,
eat bees minus sting.

go on sorties
for hornets

Black beak, red eye
I throw toss my gift into the sky.

I watch, you catch

Stained glass color swatches
cover us in patches.

I'm starting to get some couplets that I like (why couplets? I have no idea...) Now I'll try a different order:


Black beak, red eye                    (I don't like the eye/I...)
I toss my gift into the sky.    

We are near-passerine,
eat bees minus sting.


Stained glass color swatches
cover us in patches.


Time for a title? I'm not satisfied with the flow of the lines yet...

Black beak, red eye
Toss gift into the sky

Near-passerine
eat bees minus sting

Stained glass patches
Glowing feather swatches

Tunnel nester
Merops apiaster

I think I'll just call it what it is...




EUROPEAN BEE-EATER (Merops apiaster)


Black beak, red eye
Toss gift into the sky

Near-passerine
eat bees minus sting

Stained glass patches
Glowing feather swatches

Tunnel nester
Merops apiaster

DRAFT © Mary Lee Hahn, 2013

I'm not completely satisfied with this yet. After all, I've only worked on it for about an hour! What were YOU inspired by this pair of European Bee-Eaters to create ?

Carol, from Carol's Corner wrote this one really quickly...

Bees?
Complainers don't like 'em
But when you pull the stingers out
They are actually
quite tasty.

© Carol Wilcox, 2013


...and then wrote back later with (WOW!) this:


"European Bee-Eaters"

Not for us
dull sparrow brown
gloss raven black
or even blue of jay. 

Not for us
a shallow scrape
a rocky ledge
a woven crescent cup. 

Not for us 
chill rain or breeze 
a narrow range
still solitude.  

Not for us
those wriggly worms
the crunch of seeds
sweet meat of fruit.

We prefer 
an adventurous life- 
mixed colors bright
migration wide
deep tunnels homes
companions close
and bees
to please our palates.

Carol Wilcox
(c) 2013


Here's Cathy Mere's (Reflect & Refine) quick-write: 


On this branch we perch.
Together
we wait,
we watch,
we listen.
Soon we hear it,
A gentle buzz,
Growing louder as it approaches.
Snap!
Dinner.

© Cathy Mere, 2013



From Kevin at Kevin's Meandering Mind:

The bee sees only green pastures
and flowers dripping with nectar,
a soft and steady hum of wings
moving it forward into the unknown
that waits patiently on every branch.

© Kevin Hodgson, 2013




The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 

"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations."


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Poetry Friday Roundup is Here!




Hyacinth Pulls the Covers Over Her Head 
and Goes Back to Sleep

The cues of light are right:
half day, half night.

But it's too cold to be bold:
to open, unfold.

Spring delights?
I withhold.

© Mary Lee Hahn, 2013



Charles Ghinga at The Father Goose Blog shares the poem "Pet Names" from his book Animal Tracks: Wild Poems to Read Aloud.

Bridget at wee words for wee ones chronicles her children's spring break with "Spring Break -- Day by Day."

Jama at Jama's Alphabet Soup has a (self-proclaimed, but I agree) Good Friday Feast. Come ready to drool. Over the French Toast, too!

Buffy Silverman, of Buffy's Blog, shares her process and final poem in the MM2013 Tournament. I was rooting for you, Buffy!

Renee, haven't you been a little busy writing poems these last few weeks? When did you have time for another installment at No Water River in the "Poetry Is..." series (...with guest poster Elizabeth Stevens Omlor and a little Emerson)?


Joyce Ray at Musings shares some really cool ideas for writing poetry with children from her Build a Poem workshop. Cupcake poems anyone? Heidi? Jama?

Tamara Will Wissinger shares her (big) plans for Poetry Month.

Heidi at my juicy little universe has come up with a fun Poetry Month project -- 30words30days: a poem for busy people.

Robyn Hood Black is urging spring along with some e.e. cummings and Poetry Month news.

Laura Purdie Salas is focusing on colors today in another of her excellent Poem Starter videos.


Laura Shovan, at Author Amok, has a fabulous interview with Christy Hale, author of DREAMING UP.

Diane Mayr has a trio of offerings: At Random Noodling, an Easter senryu (like a haiku, but about human nature instead of Nature). Kurious Kitty shares William Blake's "Spring." KK's Kwotes has a quote by Jane Hirshfield.

Linda at TeacherDance has found the perfect William Stafford poem for two online communities -- Poetry Friday regulars and Slice of Life participants.

Matt Forrest Esenwine at Radio, Rhythm & Rhyme has an original crocus poem for this last Friday of March. (His fight with snow, mine just had to contend with oak leaves the year I snapped this shot!)


Lori Ann Grover has "Plumeria" at On Point, and World Rat Day at readertotz.

At NC Teacher Stuff, Matt Barger shares "Just Before April Came" by Carl Sandburg. (The first line is not true where I live!)

Donna, at Mainely Write, shares a poem that grew out of a GoogleChat with her daughter.

Tabatha Yeatts, at The Opposite of Indifference, shines a spotlight on the Little Patuxent Review and poet Elizabeth Dahl.

J. Patrick Lewis is making a rock-and-roll appearance at Greg Pincus' GottaBook.

I'm so glad that Catherine, at Reading to the Core, found Mary Ann Hoberman's THE TREE THAT TIME BUILT! She shares "You and I" from this excellent collection.



Three from Sylvia Vardell: at the Poetry Friday Anthology blog, a loose tooth poem by Carole Boston Weatherford; an announcement about upcoming "poem movies" at the Poetry Friday Anthology/Middle School blog; and at Poetry for Children, her own blog, an example of a "poem movie" made by 6th graders at an international school in the Netherlands.

Tara @ A Teaching Life has some Walt Whitman to help us think about the week's current events.

Margaret, at Reflections on the Teche, has ambitious form-a-day plans for herself and her students for National Poetry Month.

Ruth has a Good Friday poem-hymn for us at There is no such thing as a God-forsaken town.

Spring is coming to Steve's valley. His original poem is posted at inside the dog... .



Travis has a book spine poem (and an invitation to submit yours) at 100 Scope Notes. (Can't wait for the review of the book of book spine poems!!)

I love pomegranates and I love the story of Persephone. I hope Katie, at the blog a time for such a word, doesn't mind being rounded up via a Poetry Friday Google search. Maybe she'll join us every week!

MotherReader has a new installment in her "songs as poetry" series. Do you recognize it?

At Following Pullitzer, Gerard Manley Hopkins' "As kingfishers catch fire" for Good Friday.

Through the Looking Glass Book Review wraps up Women's History Month with VHERSES by J. Patrick Lewis.

Orange Marmalade shares "These Three" by X.J. Kennedy for Good Friday and Easter Sunday.

Andi has a "text message found poem" at a wrung sponge. If you haven't cleared out your texts, you probably have one there, too, waiting to be found!


I'm pretty sure that in real life, Amy LV is still floating after the release this week of her first book, FOREST HAS A SONG. But for today, she's got her feet on the ground with a red boots poem at The Poem Farm.

At Douglas Florian's Florian Cafe this week, [in Just-] by e.e. cummings.

Anastasia Suen has a snippet of SPRING BLOSSOMS by Carole Gerber at her blog Booktalking, and she's started a new Poetry Blog for National Poetry Month (and beyond)!!

Cactus are blooming at Joy's blog, Poetry For Kids Joy!

Janet at All About the Books With Janet Squires is featuring KEEPERS: TREASURE-HUNT POEMS by John Frank.

Violet writes from an interesting point of view in her Good Friday poem today. "Betrayer" is at Violet Nesdoly / Poems.

At The Drift Record, Julie Larios spotlights the line-up for the 2013 Kidlitosphere Progressive Poem.


Samuel Kent posts 5 new poems every week at I Drew It. His favorite this week was inspired by #MM2013: "Banking on the Tooth Fairy."

Betsy at Teaching Young Writers found the seed for this week's poem in her writer's notebook.

Cathy wrote a rhyming poem to honor her card-playing mom. I hope there's a little bit of hyperbole in her poem, too! You can find it at Merely Day By Day.

Keri at Keri Recommends is late to the roundup because she and her husband were working with their bees all day. She wrote a trio of haiku in honor of the day.

Iphigene at Gathering Books shares a Good Friday poem: "Todo y Nada/All or Nothing."

Jone is in with a poem that perfectly captures the last days of school before spring break. She posted it at her blog Deo Writer.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Poetry Friday -- Retro Post


This post originally appeared as a part of my 2013 Poetry Month Project: Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations. I am working to gather my Poetry Month Projects and other assorted original poems on my website, Poetrepository. I'm not anywhere near finished yet, but it's been fun to look back. A huge thank you to Amy LV for her website, The Poem Farm, which was my "mentor text" for the design of my site. I chose this one for today because as you are reading it, I will be fly fishing in Vermont!

Margaret has today's roundup at Reflections on the Teche. See you next week here at A Year of Reading for the Poetry Friday Roundup! Until then, I'll wish you "tight lines!"





I have been involved with Casting for Recovery since 2005, when I was a participant. I have written about it many times here on the blog. Use the search box ("Casting for Recovery") to find these posts, if the spirit moves you. And if you want, you can even "like" the Ohio CFR Facebook Page!

One of my favorite fishing memories happened in Maine when I treated myself to a trip to L.L. Bean's Women's Fly Fishing School. After I completed the classes, I fished on several rivers in Maine before returning home. One was much like the picture above, and although I wasn't dressed like that pre-1920's fisherwoman, I was standing on a large boulder, fishing alone. Alone, but not alone. A flock of cedar waxwings crowded the bank, chasing after the fly I was casting. I was having no luck with the fish, so I just stood quietly to enjoy the birds. When I had been still for a few minutes, one of the birds perched on the tip of my fly rod! My favorite fly fishing catch of all time!! Here's a haiku about that day:


RIVERBANK IN MAINE

Cedar waxwings flocked,
curious about my casts.
Calm fly rod: bird perch.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013


You might have noticed that there is no attribution for this picture. That's because it's in the Public Domain. Here's what Wikimedia Commons had to say about public domain as it relates to this photo:

"This Canadian work is in the public domain in Canada because its copyright has expired due to one of the following:
1. it was subject to Crown copyright and was first published more than 50 years ago, or
it was not subject to Crown copyright, and
2. it is a photograph that was created prior to January 1, 1949, or
3. the creator died more than 50 years ago.

This work is in the public domain in the United States because it was published (or registered with the U.S. Copyright Office) before January 1, 1923.
Public domain works must be out of copyright in both the United States and in the source country of the work in order to be hosted on the Commons. If the work is not a U.S. work, the file must have an additional copyright tag indicating the copyright status in the source country."


The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project was


"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I featured media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I used the media to inspire my poetry, and I invited my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!


Friday, March 22, 2013

Poetry Friday -- The One I Didn't Submit

Flickr Creative Commons photo "Macro Smiley" by BlueRidgeKitties






SEARCH ENGINE BLUES 

It seemed like a valid request. 
My computer didn’t agree.
Its cold, inhuman glare
left no uncertainty:

there would be no cooperation, 
no figures and nary a fact.
In an ironic change of conditions
I was the one getting hacked.


© Mary Lee Hahn, 2013


This is the poem I didn't submit in the second round of Madness 2013, the poetry tournament hosted by Ed DeCaria at Think Kid, Think. My word was INHUMAN. I tried to write about Orion (human-shaped on an inhuman scale) but my muse wouldn't allow it. Or maybe I should say, I couldn't make anything of it. Whatever the case, I didn't trust the poem I eventually submitted, so I wrote this one and asked a few people to pick their favorite. Hands down, the one I submitted was preferred. You can't believe how scary it was (for me) to submit a poem with regular rhythm and rhyme! That is WAY outside my box. But it was the right poem at the right time. I moved on, and voting is in progress on the third round of poems.

My third round poem using the word CONSERVATIVE is here. When I signed up for #MMPoetry, I knew that most often, funny, rhythmic, rhyming poems carry the day in this contest. In the second round, I played that card myself! So we'll just have to see what my "gorgeous word portrait" (thank you, Carol Wilcox!) can do against an over-confident baseball player. Make sure you visit ALL of the third round poems. Read, vote for what YOU think are the best poems, and join the fun in the comments. 

Greg has the Poetry Friday roundup today at GottaBook, and I'll be hosting next Friday, on the eve (almost) of Poetry Month. I'm hoping to hear about lots of your Poetry Month 2013 projects. I'm hoping I will have decided by then what I'm going to do!



FTC Required Disclosure: This site is an Amazon affiliate, and purchases made through Amazon links may result in my receiving a small commission (at no additional cost to you).

Friday, April 26, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.26

Creative Commons photo by Brocken Inaglory. The image was edited by user:Alvesgaspar
From Wikimedia Commons Featured Images: Natural Phenomena

BUBBLE

thin 
skin:
just
water 
and 
soap

clear sphere:
a vessel 
of hope

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013



Hold me gently:
fingertips touching tender skin;
for inside,
I remain invisible
and vulnerable to the way things have been.
I float above this world,
in a cloak of color
but my rainbow drains easily,
so be gentle.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013



From Carol (Carol's Corner):

"Soap Bubble"

A gentle puff
rainbow carriage
appears
dancing
shimmering
glimmering
inviting me
to journey
to a magical
far away
fairy world.

(c) Carol Wilcox, 2013


From Margaret (Reflections on the Teche):

To see life
in a bubble
like a looking glass
transparent
spherical
silky
slide across
slip inside
pop
fly!

©Margaret Simon, 2013


From Lisa (steps and staircases):


and a haiku:

Bubble reflecting
my home, my world, me; this day
an island in time

©Lisa


From Cathy (Merely Day by Day):

Bubbles

Bubble, Bubble,
blow, blow.

Bubble, bubble,
grow, grow.

Bubble, bubble,
soar, soar.

Bubble, bubble,
more, more.

Bubble, bubble,
fly, fly,

Bubble, bubble,
high, high,

Bubble, bubble,
drop, drop,

Bubble, bubble,
Pop!

Pop!

©Cathy Mere, 2013



Laura Purdie Salas has the Poetry Friday roundup this week at Writing the World for Kids.

Here is the other media I've featured this week (and, of course, the poems the media inspired--poems by me, and by the three or four other people who have been playing along with me this month):

Thursday: Photo of Broadway Tower
Wednesday: Video of a Sushi Train 
Tuesday: Sound of Birdsong
Monday: "Irises" by Vincent VanGogh
Sunday: Animation of a Rubik's Cube (edited to add a video made by one of my students of him solving the cube in under 20 seconds)
Saturday: Old Map of San Antonio, TX




The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 


"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Sunday, March 31, 2013

National Poetry Month: Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations



The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 

"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations."

Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute"along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.


Sunday, April 28, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.28



Photos by Gideon Pisanty (Gidip) גדעון פיזנטי, from Wikimedia Commons

This photographer has five photos of this female long-horned bee collecting nectar and pollinating this flower. Yesterday's photo prompted poems about work, and perhaps today's will, too. That seems fitting, because today is Workers' Memorial Day, "an international day of remembrance and action for workers killed, disabled, injured or made unwell by their work."


BEES

clamber
climb
pry

nectar 
pollen
sky

home 
hive
fly

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013





My leg gets stuck
at every opening
I crawl into
so that I must always
ask for help
before returning
home.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013


From Margaret (Reflections on the Teche):


fly
buzz
land

flower
sweet
syrup

busy
happy
bee 


©Margaret Simon, 2013


From Linda (TeacherDance):

We appreciate
the time the bees
are busy buzzy, 
making their knees
fat and golden,
pollen fuzzy.

©Linda Baie, 2013


From Carol (Carol's Corner):

"ABC's of Honeybees"

Apian adventurers
busily buzzing
ceaselessly collecting
diving and delving
ever exploring
fragrant flowers
groping gardens
hoping honey's
ingredients are inside.

joyfully journeying
keenly kavorting
looking leads to
miraculous meadow of
never-ending nectar

obviously the only option is to
pull from petals make
ready for recycling
suck into second stomach
through tubular tongue
unload and use
working wings to dehydrate
extract any extras

zweeeeeet!

(c) Carol Wilcox, 2013 




The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 


"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Saturday, April 20, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.20


Map of San Antonio, Texas
(Image is in the Public Domain, from Wikimedia Commons)

For the third Saturday in a row, I am not at home, enjoying the leisure and luxury that is sometimes known as Saturday. 

I am in San Antonio, Texas at the International Reading Association conference. As I'm out and about today, I'll be thinking about San Antonio's past, the river that runs through it, and maybe those flat, dry plains that spread to the horizon from its edges. Maybe today's image is about the known and the unknown. So many possible directions to go with your writing, when you've got a map in mind.


winding ribbon of water

fed by natural springs
lined by hundred year-old cypress trees
polka-dotted by restaurant umbrellas
serenaded by mariachi bands
cruised by tour boats

beloved heart of San Antonio

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013


From Linda (TeacherDance):


In My Mind’s Eye
This older map
of straight lines
hides the crooked stories
of the past:
in the houses
down the street,
next door,
across the way,
in the alley,
catty-cornered,
in the park,
third floor,
a street away,
at the second stop sign,
along the river,
just out of town.

I just need to look
and imagine.

© Linda Baie, 2013



Heading left,
I turn right;
North then south,
then easterly towards the wildest west,
until the present fades from view
into the past,
sepia-toned and yellowed with age.
The color drains
out of experience
as I dig deep into the stories
sunk down deep into the grids
of time.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013


From Cathy (Merely Day by Day):

the river
ever moving
meanders
surrounded by trees
watching
listening to the stories
that envelop it
for centuries
it babbles
gurgles
yet keeps many secrets
the river
ever moving
yet eternally entrapped
within this bed

©Cathy Mere, 2013


From Carol (Carol's Corner):

"Travelling"

long before the sun
climbs over the horizon

we travel eastward
across the plains of Colorado
past the cornfields of
Nebraska and Iowa
over the wide brown Mississippi
into Illinois.

The map,
once a precisely
fractioned pamphlet
becomes an unwieldy mass
as it is recreased
refolded
then reopened

my stubby seven-year-old finger
wonderingly
traces our route
amazed that
I have journeyed this
so far into this
big wide world.

(C) Carol Wilcox, 2013



The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 


"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.23






"Bird songs recorded in the forest of Fontainebleau (France). You can especially hear some wrens." 
The author, barracuda1983, has released this work into the Public Domain. It can be found on Wikimedia Commons.


BIRDSONG

The leader of the early morning bird walk was a quiet-spoken angular man.
He led us across dew-soaked grass to the forest's edge.

Robins and Bluejays were spotted in the October sky;
Carolina Wrens sang way too loudly for their diminutive size.

Rarely were there surprises.
I remember mostly the comforting sameness of the walks.

Sassafras leaves, worm castings, 
and the sound of the woods waking up with a song in its heart.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013




I find peace and solace in this space
with only the birds singing
their musical refrains.

When no one is watching or aware,
I join in, too,
meshing my harsh voice with theirs.

We remix nature together,
them and I, here in these woods,
until only the sunset quiets us down.

As the moon rises it skyward arc,
the birds fall silent, to sleep,
yet still, I sing into starlight.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013



From Linda (TeacherDance):

Back Home

Rasp and chatter
Carolina Wren
calls me
back to my forest friends
teakettle, teakettle
cheer cheer
cardinal flashing
spring is here

alive with chicka-dee dee
leafy-damp smell
walking in my forest
all is well

©Linda Baie, 2013



From Steve (Inside the Dog):

Where?

Where does
the birds’ song
come from?
Of course,
we know:
from deep inside
and past
the narrow
cords of sinew,
a drawn breath
squeezed tight,
a tiny explosion
of must
flung to the sky.
These things we
know. But
where does
the birds’ song
come from?
And how can
it alight so precisely
in the heart?

© Steve Peterson, 2013


From Carol (Carol's Corner):


frigid april morning
red breasted robin huddles
saving songs for spring


busy shovels throw
piles of wet slushy snow
no bird songs today


Hey Mr. Redbreast
ignore this swirling gray whiteness
sing your song of spring


welcome mr. robin
glad you brought your own sunshine
to this cloudy day


Three April blizzards
long to listen to bird songs
not clanking shovels


Mr. Weatherman
we should be planting flowers
not shoveling snow


One more blizzard then
we shut the door on winter
and welcome bird's song


Bird choir ignores
howling April blizzard to
sing spring aria.


April showers bring
May flowers, April blizzards
bring grumpy poets 

©Carol Wilcox, 2013


    

The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 

"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 

Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Sunday, April 21, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.21

PocketCube (small)

By Silver Spoon (Own work) via Wikimedia Commons


I have a couple of students who are obsessed with Rubik's Cubes and who are AMAZING at solving this puzzle. They study videos, learn algorithms, and work with a timer to improve their times. This kind of thinking is completely outside my skill set. I am in awe of them. Here is a video one of these Rubik's Cube experts made of himself solving the cube in under 20 seconds:



Video used with the permission from mariojj123Cubing


RUBIK'S CUBE

Rotate layers -- twist twist spin --
Up and down -- twist twist spin --
Backwards, forwards -- twist twist spin --
It's solved! ...How did you do that?
Kindly repeat, but
Slower this time...

Clickclick twisttwist spinspin
Updownaround, faster than you can follow.
Believe it...because you see it happen before your very
Eyes.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013




"It only takes 20 moves,"
the boy whispered, as his father stared
at the young fingers
quickly swiveling and twisting the color tiles,
remixing the cube back towards its original and perfect state,
"and I can do it in less," the boy boasted,
barely looking at his hands in movement,
matching up colors in a blur of speed
and confidence.

Instead, the boy gazed intently at his father,
seeking a compliment, or comment,
or an acknowledgement at the very least,
but all he got was that dead-eyed look of an adult
suddenly realizing just how difficult it would be
to put his own fractured world back together in just
20 moves or less.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013



From Linda (TeacherDance):


Mr. Rubik, thank you!
You gave magic to those
drowning
in two-dimensional school.
They got to show their talents
as their fingers twisted and turned-
all eyes watching.
The teacher turned away,
but his thoughts filled
with new ideas
of what might be. 

©Linda Baie, 2013


From Cathy (Merely Day by Day):


Rubik's Cube

I gave my cube a twist,
and then a turn or two,
the colors started mixing,
what was I to do?

I twisted more and more,
I tried to match a row,
but the harder that I tried,
the less I seemed to know.

Now I look upon my cube,
a tear drop I have cried,
because for the life of me,
I can't even match a side!

©Cathy Mere, 2013


From Carol (Carol's Corner):


"A Rubik's Cube Kind of Life"

The Rubik's cube,
Those six faces
red, yellow, blue,
green, white, orange,
a twist, a turn, a spin, 
in the hands of some 
the faces magically align.

In my hands
that crazy cube
doesn't quite work that way
I twist one way
sure that that will make a color align
but then another color
is misaligned
and I make one more twist
sure that I will create perfection
and then two faces are misaligned.

Sometimes life
is a lot like a Rubik's cube
all those facets- 
family, friends, finances,
job, house, God--
and I think if I just make one shift,
if I just get up half hour earlier,
or spend $20 less here or there,
or pray a little harder
just that one twist
and all of the faces will align.

Except they never do. 

(c) Carol Wilcox, 2013 




The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 

"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Friday, April 19, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.19



Ocean Waves, by Luftrum via Wikimedia Commons

SWIMMING POOL MEMORY

I remember the day I learned to float on my back --
      lying in the middle of the pool's chlorine ocean
      listening to the sound of the water in my ears
      looking up at the blue blue Colorado sky
      feeling the cradle of the water rock me back and forth

I didn't hear them yelling at me to come out of the pool --
      lessons long over
      the other children wrapped in towels
      my own reverie broken
      feeling a loss when I climbed from water to land

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013


From Kevin (Kevin's Meandering Mind):

She was always happiest
sitting by the window of the house
overlooking the Atlantic Ocean,
knotty hands knitting
as she listened to the rhythm of the tides
coming and going, like the years,
just like the years, coming and going,
and sometimes, I'd see her eyes close,
as if she were floating away for a few minutes
towards something better.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013

The podcast is here.


From Carol (Carol's Corner):

“Underwater”

I am five.
Marge Westbay tells me to sit
on the steps at the pool
until it is my turn
to swim with her.

I mean to sit there
But then somehow
I am underwater
moving weightlessly
through a strange and magical
aqua green world

enchanted
by the dappled sunlight
dancing
on the bottom
of the pool

The lifeguard
drags me to the top
sits my bottom hard
on the edge of the pool
and scolds me
for moving toward that magic.

© Carol Wilcox, 2013


Irene has the Poetry Friday roundup at Live Your Poem...  Hopefully this week I'll be able to visit the roundup and catch up on some of the amazing projects others are doing this month!



The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 


"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Thursday, April 04, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.4

Wikimedia Commons: Le Silence by Antoine-Augustin Préault
Wikimedia Commons has lots of famous art to explore. I saw a plaster cast of this sculpture by Antoine-Augustin Préault at the Art Institute of Chicago last month. The title is Le Silence. It is a carving on the tomb of Jacob Roblés and can be found in the Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

Today's poem arrived as I as ironing a pair of slacks. Isn't that how creativity often works? You quit trying so hard and...boom. There it is.




LE SILENCE

On the days I long for silence
remind me, please
of giggles.

On the days we pass in silence
remind me, please
of finishing each other's sentences.

On the days that seem filled with silence
remind me, please
of chickadees.

On the nights I hear only silence
remind me, please
to listen for the music of the spheres.

©Mary Lee Hahn, 2013



Kevin (Kevin's Meandering Mind) left this in the comments:

Shhhh,
she said,
as I raised my voice to protest
yet again the unfairness of it all
as if my words could change this stone barrier
when I know now that what I
needed was
silence.

©Kevin Hodgson, 2013


And Carol (Carol's Corner) wrote this wistful beauty:


"Shhhh…"

Shhhhh…
Let us not speak 
of pools at summer's end
dropped ice cream cones
jeans that used to fit.

Neither will we speak of
birthday cards not mailed
library books overdue
friendships left untended.


And of course there will be no talk of
toddlers now adults
nests that echo emptiness
forgetful parents


And please do not bring up
Bubbles burst
Broken promises
Dashed dreams.

We will not speak of these.
Shhhhh…


(c) Carol Wilcox, 2013



If you have a minute, go back to yesterday's post and check out the responses from Carol (not to be missed) and Lisa (I've got a new "career" :-).



The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 


"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 


Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.

Wednesday, April 03, 2013

Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations.3


Before we get too far along in the month, I'd like to explain where I got the idea for this project. Or at least trace back to some of the seed ideas that led to it.

1. BLOGGING
When you put your ideas an opinions out there into the world several times a week for 7+ years, you think hard about the way you use others' work based on the ways you hope others are using yours.

2. POETRY FRIDAY
Most every blogger who participates in Poetry Friday is very mindful about getting permission to share another poet's whole poems, or else they post a part of a poem and link to another site (or the book) where the rest can be found. I've never been turned down when I emailed a poet to ask for permission to use a poem on our blog. All were thrilled to be asked.

3. STUDENTS AND COPYING
Teachers and librarians have made it crystal clear to students that copying others' work is very very bad. And it is. We don't want them to copy others' homework or others' answers on math tests. But children overgeneralize our adult finger-shaking and believe that if they put a red umbrella in their story, then any other child in the class who puts a red umbrella in their story is copying, which is very very bad. Parody feels to children like it, too, should be illegal. It seems too much like copying.

And yet I see my students (taught, sometimes, to do this by other teachers) dragging images to their computer desktop to use without attribution in their projects...without a second thought about copying. It seems like it's just easier to ban all kinds of copying than it is to explore the fine lines of sharing and remixing ideas and to take the time to ask for permission or cite attribution.

With this project, I want to
  • raise awareness of the resources that are available and freely offered for use/reuse
  • model attribution etiquette
  • promote the spirit of creative collaboration
The graphic I created as the logo for this project? I found the image by doing a Google search of "Creative Commons," then I narrowed my search by choosing "Images," and then (MOST IMPORTANT STEP) I went up to the OPTIONS icon (looks like a grey gear at the top right of the page) and chose "Advanced Search." From there, I scrolled clear to the bottom and chose "Usage Rights --> (drop down) Free to Use or Share." The image I selected for my logo is in the Public Domain. I inserted it into a Word document, repeatedly typed the title of the project so that it would wrap around the image, played around with the fonts until I got it to look the way I wanted, took a screen shot and voila! My logo was born! I made something new by combining my ideas with the freely shared ideas of others.

Today, I'm thinking about this quote

"Welcome to a new world 
where collaboration rules."

which came from this video on the Creative Commons website: Wanna Work Together? (Go watch the video. I'll wait...)


THE RULES OF COLLABORATION

1. Share ideas.
2. Create with joy.
3. Work together.
4. Don't destroy.

© Mary Lee Hahn, 2013

(First day of school after break...brain drain...that's the best I can do right now...maybe I'll come back later with something more inspired...or maybe not...)


Here's a sweet little "almost haiku" from Lisa (Steps and Staircases):

Well said, as always--
Mary Lee, monitor and guide
of Internet hallways!



From Carol (Carol's Corner), after a looooonnnggg day of work, this brilliant Abcedarian, which I'm thinking I'll make into a poster for my classroom motto:


"ABC's of Collaboration"

Avail yourself of every opportunity
Because you never know when
Coming together could lead to creation.
Delight in differences
Engage in each other’s possibilities
Feel free to make mistakes.
Give up the need to be right and 
Humble yourself to others’
Intelligence and imagination.
Just be ready for surprises.
Know that there will be conflict
Laugh a lot.
Make miracles together
Never quit listening asking sharing believing
Open your eyes and your heart
Plan a little, play more.
Quiet the inner doubter
Resist the need to be right
Stay open to surprises
Take time to laugh.
Up the ante.
View the world through new eyes
Wonder at what might be possible
Excite yourself about others’ ideas

You never know when your

zeal might reap rewards. 

© Carol Wilcox, 2013



If you have a minute, go back to yesterday's post and check out some of the fire-breathing poems that Carol, Linda and Kevin wrote!

The theme of my 2013 National Poetry Month Project is 

"Common Inspiration--Uncommon Creations." 

Each day in April, I will feature media from the Wikimedia Commons ("a database of 16,565,065 freely usable media files to which anyone can contribute") along with bits and pieces of my brainstorming and both unfinished and finished poems.

I will be using the media to inspire my poetry, but I am going to invite my students to use my daily media picks to inspire any original creation: poems, stories, comics, music, videos, sculptures, drawings...anything!

You are invited to join the fun, too! Leave a link to your creation in the comments and I'll add it to that day's post. I'll add pictures of my students' work throughout the month as well.